A worth reading Tutorial for Asterisk Hardware and software configuration

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2 thoughts on - A worth reading Tutorial for Asterisk Hardware and software configuration

  • 1) I don’t see anything in the article that requires ‘at least university
    level programming experience.’

    2) Using shading and colors to highlight ‘code’ makes the article hard to
    read and I suspect printing may render it useless. How about if you offset
    the code sections using font (which you already do), indentation, and
    consistent application of whitespace between code and text?

    3) Did you intend to install most of the prerequisite packages with ‘-v’
    instead of ‘-y?’

    4) You should be consistent in your choice of font and font attributes in
    your text.

    5) You should ‘proof’ your article for consistent and correct whitespace
    and capitalization.

    6) You should have your article read by someone whose primary language is
    English. I commend you for doing a better job than I could in any language
    other that English, but the article does not ‘read’ well.

    7) The inclusion of a loop-back connector is a nice touch.

    8) In the ‘Sound Files Conversion and Usage’ section, you say ‘Wav (this
    is not the wav files that we play in windows it have a different
    compression).’

    I think you are referring to WAV49. The WAV files I use (‘RIFF
    (little-endian) data, WAVE audio, Microsoft PCM, 16 bit, mono 8000 Hz’)
    play fine on Windows and Linux. If I remember correctly, WAV49 uses GSM
    which confuses most Windows sound programs.

    9) In the shell snippet to convert sound files, you use backticks to
    substitute the file type. This method creates 3 processes. You can
    accomplish this using shell parameter expansion without creating any
    additional processes. For example

    sox “$a” “${a%.wav}.sln”

    Note that this method will not be confused by a file named ‘test.wav.wav’
    either.

    10) You should present your ‘Abbreviations’ section in alphabetical order.

    I did not attempt to review most of the article for technical merit. I
    suspect the inclusion of Java AGIs and storing CDRs in a database are
    outside the interest of ‘newbies’ and warrant articles of their own.

  • Thank you very much Steve. Thanks for the in detail recommendations. I will
    make modifications and let you know.